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ID: 530 Title: Advice for a beginner Replis: 7 Read: 4389 Author: 4  Page:[1]  2  
Name: Leeor  Posts: 2  **  Vancouver Time: 2010-12-27_13:46:19 Quote    Reply
I have no seafaring experience but am looking to get started with a number of specific goals and I was wondering if anyone had some advice for me. I am probably not going to make this into a lifelong endeavor, but I am very interested in various forms of transportation and would like to learn more about boating. I would also like to do some traveling soon, and hope to keep costs down and avoid airplanes as much as possible while traveling. Eventually I would like to cross an ocean or two by boat. So my questions essentially is what is the best way to get started learning necessary skills, and how can I find opportunities to go across the ocean as crew on a boat? Thanks
Name: Stickbugg  Posts: 1  **  Vancouver Time: 2012-10-17_14:19:13 Quote    Reply
I am in the same situation. I have made the point of taking basic sailing lessons at the local marina, and trying to get out on the lake in the dinghy of whoever will loan one for me. Next summer, I plan to get onto more cruising boats and learn navigation and such. But as far as appealing to people searching for casual crew (not for pay/commercial), what would you say are the most important things? --Quincy
Name: OCEAN SAILOR  Posts: 157  **  Vancouver Time: 2012-10-28_15:39:18 Quote    Reply

First and foremost determine whether you are prone to seasickness which means jump on a boat for a weekend in moderate seas as a hanger on.

IF YOU SUFFER FROM SEA SICKNESS GO NO FURTHER AND SAVE YOURSELF THE TIME, ENERGY, SUFFERING AND EXPENSES.

Name: JAX Ashby  Posts: 14    Vancouver Time: 2012-12-16_3:25:14 Quote    Reply
Almost everyone gets seasick under some condition or conditions. Only those with a specific birth defect in the inner ear don't, and that's only about 1 person in 200...... However, almost everyone gets used to a particular boat in short order. Yet, even those with bellies of steel on their own boat can get rather green looking on a different size boat in different conditions...... I was on a troop ship once in a north Pacific storm in January for three days, and 3,300 strong, healthy, well-conditioned Marines got seasick, while 50 or so didn't. --But the crew of the ship, used to the ship did not get sick.-- ....... Still, a tiny, tiny, tiny percentage of people get seasick ALWAYS and stay seasick....... To the OP, sailing is not necessarily a good thing if your goal is to "go places" on the cheap. Ya GOTTA love sailing to be on a sailboat often and for some time each time. Suggest a couple of baby steps first....... Good luck.
Name: OCEAN SAILOR  Posts: 157  **  Vancouver Time: 2012-12-17_11:31:27 Quote    Reply
"Almost everyone gets seasick under some condition or conditions. Only those with a specific birth defect in the inner ear don't, and that's only about 1 person in 200 However, almost everyone gets used to a particular boat in short order. Yet, even those with bellies of steel on their own boat can get rather green looking on a different size boat in different conditions. I was on a troop ship once in a north Pacific storm in January for three days, and 7,300 strong, healthy, well-conditioned Marines got seasick, while 50 or so didn't. --But the crew of the ship, used to the ship did not get sick. Still, a tiny, tiny, tiny percentage of people get seasick ALWAYS and stay seasick. To the OP, sailing is not necessarily a good thing if your goal is to "go places" on the cheap. Ya GOTTA love sailing to be on a sailboat often and for some time each time." -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Do you have any stats to back your quoted figuers. Please quote your source when quoting stats.You can't compare a large rolling non sailing militay vessel, they are substantially beamer, hence the increased pitching, with a small sailing vessel.

Most skippers will ask the sea sickness question and will always pick crew that don't usually get sea sick. Suffer acute sea sickness and the crew member dehydrates and you have to bury him at sea because could not medical assistance could face serioius charges or if you have to change course / schedule and the have him admitted to hospital with no medical insurance the skipper is liable for the bill, plus the Sat phone charges that are surely to arise trying to get advice to keep him alive, which 6 must do.

Gets extremely expensive for skippers taking on crew
hitch hiking on the cheap as you put it. Also can,t leave port untill he is discharged / bill paid or all plus an airfare to his home port if you want to leave port without him because you would not take a second shot at that person being on board again. I kid you not. A Skipper must sign a declaration on entering port he is responsible for all crew members whilst in port, agree to obey their laws, customs, rituals ect including crew plus all debts and costs plus ...........

Get sea sick be prepared to post a $30,000 bond.



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