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ID: 826 Title: CREW FAILED TO SAVE A CREW MEMBER OVERBOARD A DISGRACE Replis: 1 Read: 55 Author: 1
Name: OCEAN SAILOR  Posts: 165  **  Vancouver Time: 2018-8-17_19:47:1 Quote    Reply


CREW FAILED TO SAVE A CREW MEMBER OVERBOARD A DISGRACE





STORY CLICK TO READ

An investigation into a yachting tragedy in which two men died concluded not enough was done by crew members to save one of the victims after they were knocked overboard. Nick Saull and Steve Forno died as a result of the incident on board the yacht Platino on June 13, 2016. While Saull was killed on board, Forno fell overboard and was never found. Maritime New Zealand's detailed investigation report released on Thursday said the yacht's surviving crew "did not effectively employ all of the equipment available to them". "At no time during the accident, or the events that followed, was any item thrown overboard (or attempted to be thrown overboard) to provide the crew member in the water with flotation."

The Platino, a 20-metre recreational yacht, departed Auckland for Fiji with a crew of five on June 11. Just over 500 kilometer's north of Cape Reinga, the yacht turned dramatically and unexpectedly to starboard. Within seconds the yacht had gone from sailing comfortably to being significantly damaged and effectively out of control, the report said. "Instantly the boom swung across the stern striking one crew member, killing him instantly. The other fell overboard," the report said. "All three surviving crew members saw the crew member in the water. However, no form of flotation aid or beacon was thrown overboard at any time in an attempt to improve his ability to remain afloat, or assist in locating him during the search. "The crew's options were severely limited by the chaotic and dangerous situation on deck, and a lack of control over the yacht. However, it appears actions could have been taken in an attempt to assist the crew member in the water, but were not." An RNZAF aircraft was on scene within 90 minutes but was unable to locate Forno. The search was officially abandoned on June 15.

The three surviving crew members, Tory and Harry McKeogh and Ross McKee were rescued by a container ship. The surviving crew said there was no opportunity, in the circumstances, to throw anything overboard because of the danger of the boom, which continued to swing across the yacht throughout the day.

The investigation and its finding has been labelled by Forno's family as a "disgrace".

Read more at READ MORE WHAT CAUSED THE ACCIDENT

Suggests that inexperience and a causal attitude towards safe sailing and a causal attitude towards recovery a fellow crew member over board.

Report shows crew should spend a portion of their watch steering manually while and during good weather and bad weather so as when the auto pilot kicks out or over rides all crew members can have such experience and be able to steer the boat satisfactory when such occurrence's happen. More so when sailing down wind because this is the majority of times the auto pilot will not handle the steering and kick out [ usually when the helmsman is not near the helm to instantly to take control to steer thus avoiding a broach ] and this is also the most difficult wind angle to maintain steering with control 160 to 170 Degrees wind angle and 190 to 200 degrees wind angle when manual steering.

I myself used to when auto pilot conditions warranted or the attitude to sail with auto pilot and be away from the helm on board was the norm to devote 50 % off my watch to manual steering. Doing 100 % watches day after day using the auto pilot at the helm or away from the helm is asking for a disaster to happen when the going gets rough.

PERSONAL OPINION ONLY

My experience From sailing on various yachts most owners have auto pilots at the minimum size for cost reason when a more prudent and safer way is to go two or three sizes higher than the manufactures recommendations for a particular vessel's length / weight.

The statement by the FORNO's family calling "The investigation and its finding has been labelled by Forno's family as a "disgrace", their statement is the disgrace [ their statement and mind set not Maritime New Zealand ] and warrants an apology by Forno's family. Maritime New Zealand is a government agency that oversees search and rescue missions for a vast area, have many years experience investigation marine incidents / accidents and maintaining safety standards for all NZ yachts leaving NZ shores, is a respected professional organization. Their [ Forno's ] statement, just shows how causal they are and possibly with a superior mind set that they know best.






















Name: OCEAN SAILOR  Posts: 165  **  Vancouver Time: 2018-8-21_22:17:4 Quote    Reply
It would appear that no crew were near the helm when the auto pilot failed due to
a leak in the hydraulic system with the hydraulic oil leaking thus the AP failed, the crew failed, leaving the vessel for a unacceptable period of uncontrolled steering down wind.