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ID: 817 Title: What Happened To Self-Sufficiency in Sailing? Replis: 0 Read: 11 Author: 1
Name: Disperser.Wolf  Posts: 13    Vancouver Time: 2018-5-9_15:8:57 Quote    Reply
I purchased a sailing vessel because I sought a self-sufficient life. I wanted the opportunity to be completely responsible for my own well being, to be, well, actually, free. Freedom can only come from self-sufficiency. And the only way I could think of to be completely and totally self-sufficient (that means not dependent upon anyone else) was to live on my own sailing vessel traveling the world's oceans.

But in the nearly 6 years I have been in the sailing world, I have yet to see a single self-sufficient sailor. How pathetic, to be honest.

Here in La Paz, people follow the example of Mac Shroyer, a sailor who came with a dream, and settled on exploiting locals and later other sailors, and La Paz has become a place where dreams go to die, and sailors go to convert their vessels into floating trailers parked in their floating trailer park; which is precisely the atmosphere at Marina de La Paz. Not to pick on La Paz too much (it is quite deserving, as it is the most corrupt place in Mexico, thanks to foreigners like Mac Shroyer who brought American style corruption to Mexico, in case any of you thought otherwise...), but I saw the exact same thing in almost every marina I visited on my way from Stockton California to Mexico; the only noted exception being Bodega Bay, a working fishing marina. But while it wasn't a trailer park, it certainly wasn't very conducive to self-sufficiency either.



So, what has happened? Why are sailors so dependent? Why can't any of you come to La Paz and figure out Spanish and where to find all the things you need on your own without consulting the radio net, some list, or asking around?

I know the answer to that question, very well. But I won't share it, except personally. I just thought it would be useful to remind the sailing community of its roots and origins, and to hopefully convey the message that sailing is the only true natural life for us human beings. We are a nomadic species. And we are supposed to be an intelligent species. That means each and every one of you are supposed to be able to take care of yourselves and not require a shore cable, hose, cell phone, radio net, and taxis to take you around to stores to buy all the things you need. We didn't evolve big brains for nothing, although most of you seem to have some kind of idea that you aren't nearly as capable as you truly are.

I'm no different than any of you, with the likely noted exception that when I was a child, I made a conscious decision to accept that school was an opportunity, not a requirement, and that if I wanted an education, I had to get it myself and utilize all resources available to me. Okay, so I was rather forced into that mindset by debilitating injuries which meant I could go to school and had to spend my time at the library instead. But still, I didn't sit home watching television, I went out and learned, so much so that after a mere two months in a library, I stayed ahead of my fellow students for the entirety of my school career! I'm not gloating mind you, I'm just suggesting that school wasn't enough and if you thought so, well, you're living in a marina, hooked up to a hose and shore power cable, waiting for the radio net so you can find out where to buy chocolate chips while I'm trying to get access to a defunct boatyard so I can finish all the work on my ship myself.



Get off the dock and get free, because otherwise, you're just waiting to die.